Nominate Fido for Canine King & Queen

By: | September 7, 2017

It is a prestigious and rare honor to be nominated for the APA’s Canine King and Queen at our annual Canine Carnival. And it’s a tough job to do the nominating with 2,500+ adoptions happening at our Adoption Center each year. Not to mention we’ve been around for almost 100 years. Do the math…that’s a lot of dogs to pick from!

So, we had a brilliant idea! Why not let someone else do the nominating, that way we ensure not one dog is left behind! (That’s what we are all about here, isn’t it?!) This year’s King and Queen nominations for Canine Court are up to YOU! Anyone can nominate any dog! It can be your dog, a friend’s dog, a neighbor’s dog. Any breed. Any age. From anywhere. We don’t want to leave anyone out.

CJ

You can nominate your favorite canine companion HERE. Once a dog is nominated, people will vote for who they think should be this year’s King & Queen on our website. Each dog will receive its own webpage with an individual link to share with their pack for easily accessible voting.

Voting is simple and it will also help homeless pets at the Adoption Center. One vote = $1. Voting will begin on September 9th, so stay tuned!

Dallas

Voting is open from September 9th until September 22nd when the finalists are paired down to the 4 males and 4 females with the most votes. Finalist voting will then continue through 12:00pm on September 29th, though votes will no longer be publicly posted. The Grand Prize winners, Canine King and Queen, will be revealed on Sunday, October 1st at Canine Carnival. (P.S. Get your Carnival tickets HERE so you don’t miss the fun!)

Spread the word and best of luck to all of the nominees!

Nominate Fido for Canine King & Queen

By: | August 26, 2016

It is a prestigious and rare honor to be nominated for the APA’s Canine King and Queen at our annual Canine Carnival. And it’s a tough job to do the nominating with 2,500+ adoptions happening at our Adoption Center each year. Not to mention we’ve been around for 94 years. Do the math…that’s a lot of dogs to pick from.

So, we had a brilliant idea! Why not let someone else do the nominating, that way we ensure not one dog is left behind! (That’s what we are all about here, isn’t it?!) This year’s King and Queen nominations for Canine Court are up to YOU! Anyone can nominate any dog! It can be your dog, a friend’s dog, a neighbor’s dog. Any breed. Any age. From anywhere. We don’t want to leave anyone out.

CJ

You can nominate your favorite canine companion HERE. Once a dog is nominated, people will vote for who they think should be this year’s King & Queen on our website. Each dog will receive its own webpage with an individual link to share with their pack for easily accessible voting.

Voting is simple and it will also help homeless pets at the Adoption Center. One vote = $1. You can vote for the nominees HERE.

Dallas

Voting is open from now until September 25th when the finalists are paired down to the 4 males and 4 females with the most votes. Finalist voting will then continue through 12:00pm on October 1st, though votes will no longer be publicly posted. The Grand Prize winners, Canine King and Queen, will be revealed on Sunday, October 2nd at Canine Carnival. (P.S. Get your Carnival tickets HERE so you don’t miss the fun!)

Spread the word and best of luck to all of the nominees!

4th of July Pet Safety Tips

By: | July 1, 2015

Scary sounds and flashes of light send some animals bolting out the door or over a fence on the 4th of July. The APA Adoption Center sees an influx of stray animals after the holiday. Keep your furry friends safe during the celebrations with these tips.

  • Leave your dog at home when you attend celebrations with fireworks. Don’t expose your pet to the crackling noises and shrieking light displays- even pets who are normally calm tend to react differently to the commotion of the 4th.
  • Never leave your pet unattended outdoors when they go to use the bathroom. Even pets who typically stay in the yard are more prone to jumping fences to escape the frightening sounds.
  • Furthermore, do not chain up your pet outside. A frightened animal will try to run, which can lead to entanglement, injury, or even death.
  • Be sure your pet is wearing current identification. If your pet is microchipped, check that your address and phone number are up-to-date, and the same goes for the ID tags they wear on their collars. 4thjuly kitten
  • Keep your pets indoors that night. Give them a cool, dark room to find a safe place to go. If your dog likes his/her crate, drape a blanket over the top to give them a better sense of security in their “den.”
  • Some people find soft music or a television helps drown out the festivities and gives their pets peace.
  • Dr. Denise Dietsch, Director of the APA Veterinary Clinic, recommends trying pheromone sprays and diffusers, available at most pet stores, to calm frightened pets.  “Pheromones are natural chemicals produced by animals that trigger behavioral responses,” she explains. “In some cases, tranquilizers are the only thing that will help.  Pet owners should consult with their veterinarians to see if this is a possible treatment.”
  • Use caution when allowing your pets outside the next day. The powder discharged by fireworks can be toxic, so it’s best to avoid areas where they might come into contact with the residue.

Follow these tips, and your pets will thank you for giving them a “safe and sane” 4th of July. Happy Independence Day from your friends at the APA Adoption Center!

4thjulydog

For a Healthy Workplace, Bring Fido Along

By: | June 24, 2015

This Friday is Take Your Dog To Work Day, a great chance for offices to open their doors to our beloved four-legged family members. Although Take Your Dog to Work Day occurs just once a year, more companies are recognizing the perks of having pets in the workplace and offering employees the option of working alongside their faithful companions.

cat at work
Cats can make purr-fect officemates.

Companies such as St. Louis’ own Purina and Build-A-Bear, along with Amazon, Google and Ben & Jerry’s, all allow furry friends to accompany their pet parent during their 9-5.

Research is showing that it’s not a bad idea at all. A 2012 study from Virginia Commonwealth University showed that the stress hormone cortisol was lower, much lower, among workers who brought their dogs to work than those who did not.

The Indianapolis Star reports that, as the workday progressed, researchers found stress levels dropped 11 percent among workers with pets, while they increased 70 percent among those who were without their animals.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also cites lowered blood pressure and cholesterol levels as benefits of having pets around.

As if that weren’t enough reason to put your pet in your cubicle, companies with pet-friendly policies also report that employee morale receives a boost, coworker relationships improve, physical activity levels are higher and employee turnover is lower when pets are around. Purina sees so much benefit in allowing pets in the workplace that they have initiated the “Pets At Work” campaign that emphasizes the perks of animals in the office and helps companies get started with their own pet-friendly policies.

So, the next time you approach your boss about bringing Fido or Kitty to work, just let him or her know that you want to do it for the good of the company. They might just consider it.

dogs at work
The more the merrier!

Living with Pet Allergies

By: | April 23, 2015

This time of year, the APA receives a lot of calls and a lot of animals due to allergies. Helping keep an animal with its family is a top priority for us, so we want to help allergy suffers know that, if the allergies are not life-threatening, there are options for living a happy, healthy life with your pet. Here are some basic tips for cohabitating with wheeze and sneeze-inducing furry friends.

kitten-sneezing-for-blog

Know thy allergies!

Are you allergic to your pet’s dander or is it something else? Get tested by a doctor to know what is causing your symptoms. Your pet might be carrying another allergen into the house on his coat. Pollen, mold and other irritants are everywhere, especially at this time of the year. If it turns out that kitty’s outdoor adventures have brought home more than you bargained for, limit her time outside.

Wash, rinse, repeat.

Wipe those fur monsters down with a damp cloth after being outside. You’ve seen how much pollen can accumulate on your car in the spring; your pet’s coat gathers pollen and other allergens, too. Wiping them off helps decrease other potential trouble makers in the air as well. You can also bathe your pet regularly. Giving him or her the full on spa treatment helps get rid of anything you missed with the cloth. Avoid washing any pet more than once a week, and use a mild, conditioning cleanser to avoid drying out their skin. Frequent fur brushing at this time of the year will also decrease the amount of dander buildup your pet is carrying. Choose a non-allergic member of the family for this task, if possible. Otherwise, many groomers are happy to help your pet shed the excess fluff.

Make your castle sparkle!

Minimize household allergens all together. Dust, vacuum, sweep and/or mop to keep your home tidy and your allergies at bay.

Keep separate quarters.

Don’t allow pets to sleep in your bed with you. Keep them off the couch and other furniture, if you notice the fur buildup is bothersome. Buy bedding for your pets that is easy to clean and doesn’t gather fur. Kuranda beds are great for that purpose; they wipe down easily and dry quickly.

Recognize the cues.

If you know your allergies are particularly bad when the magnolia trees begin to bloom, plan accordingly. Occasionally taking an over-the-counter antihistamine can treat your symptoms and give your peace of mind in the warm weather months.

weimaraner-for-blogAs part of our mission of bringing people and pets together, the APA also strives to keep people and pets together. When both furry and non-furry members of the household can live together in harmony, we all breathe a little easier.